About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
population control, the environment and they don't have anything in common with us. they get a peak of did a couple people they have out front to be their conservative individuals but if you really start peeling back the leaders of the onion and will make you cry. it's not conservative at all. they've got us fighting on this issue so much that the national conservative authors are claiming that it's one of the conservative principles. we need to use our conservative principles to address our problem and i think that is what has happened to the recent and it's not just about trying to win the election but grow the party and welcome people and we are wanting you to feel like you are at home. many to learn that in their rhetoric that has been displayed and is doing more damage than it is good. >> i should preface my remarks on this by saying i am in complete agreement that conservatives and republicans need to do a better job or some cases a job for the first time to appeal to hispanic voters and other nonwhite voters but we shouldn't kid ourselves about some of the obstacles we need to start
're not directly getting at that. >> i think the carbon tax makes enormous sense to do with the environment impact of energy use. you can design one in a way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax, there are things you can do to treat the income tax to make it look more like a consumption tax. >> i want each of you to give me your thoughts at the end of the day, what do you think the tax code will look like with his conversations between the cop -- between the president speaker boehner are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some high-income tax -- and these 1 high income tax payer. i think there will be a variety of tax exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly. >> if scaled-back means capped in some way, i agree completely. rex i think we will see some of those things will back. the top rate will be either 39.6 or 35. it will be somewhere in between. >> we have some common ground here among our economists. thank you, a gentleman for joining us. thank you all. i appreciate the peterson
the global environment is much more difficult. see what's happening in europe, in the middle east, in china. second of all, you just had an election, and one of the messages of the election was one of shared responsibility and fairer burden sharing, in which the rich have done extremely well not just on the outside but also in terms of being protected on the down side. finally, and more importantly, the economic arguments against this, while they would be valid at higher tax rates are not valid here. so if you look at the hand the president has, it is stronger than the republicans', and i think both of them will want to seek some sort of compromise. >> it sounds so reasonable. let's bring in steve warren. he's an editor at the wall street journal, a conservative. steven, do you agree, are the republicans ready to strike a deal with the president if it means giving up the bush tax cuts for the wealthy? they have dug in on this. >> i don't know, ali. i listen to this conversation and i feel like i'm living in france. i see no economic wisdom in raising tax rates in an economy that is so fragi
in the foot at a time when the global environment is much more difficult. see what is happening in europe, in the middle east and china. secondly, we just had an election, ali. the message, one of the messages of the election was one of shared responsibility and farrer burden sharing. it's a period in which the rich have done extremely well. not just on the up side, but also in terms of being protected on the down side. >> fin finally and importantly, the economic arguments against this while they'll be valid at higher tax rates are not valid here. so if you look at the hand that president has, it is stronger than what the republicans and i think both of them will want to seek some sort of compromise. >> sounds so reasonable. let's bring stephen moore in. he is a writer at the "wall street journal." he's conservative. stephen, do you agree? are republicans ready to strike a deal with the president if it means giving up the bush tax cuts for the wealth. >> i they have dug in on this. >> i don't know, ali. i listen to this conversation. i feel like i'm living in france. i mean i just don't
: well, me... me personally, i say, "get your education." >> kleinfeld: the environment is changing all the time. and if you don't stay on top of things, you know, somebody will eat your lunch. >> pitts: despite its efforts to retrain and recruit, alcoa has 27 job openings at its michigan plant alone. who do you blame for the skills gap in this country? >> kleinfeld: i don't blame anybody for that. >> pitts: who bears responsibility for you? >> kleinfeld: i think it's more an educational aspect. it's... i think it's a sensitivity to understand what makes a country and a business competitive. >> pitts: i would imagine if you had a parts gap, you'd close it right away, right? >> kleinfeld: if we had a parts gap, we'd try to close it right away, yes. >> pitts: then why can't that occur with the skills gap? >> kleinfeld: don't get from this that we're sitting together here because our... because alcoa is complaining that we can't fill the skills gap. that is absolutely not my message. we can absolutely fill that, absolutely. i mean, the... for alcoa, we can do it. we are doing it. and many
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> vegetation and he likes to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit from our building. >> is that okay on your hand, looks like he's breaking skin. >> this is the first time you haven't been pooped on or bleeding. the turkey did enough for everybody. thank you so much, dave. >> thank yo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)